Guide to eating low FODMAP in East Austin

Nov 24, 2018

Today we’re continuing our tour of my favorite places to eat in Austin! If you missed it, check out Downtown, South, and North Austin!

Up today in my guide to eating low FODMAP in Austin is the east side! Y’all. East Austin is where the good food’s at. I’m writing this post staring at photos of fries and pizza and basically drooling on my computer. Downtown might be where spend most of our time, but East Austin is where we go when we want some solid food.

Enjoy! Next up are South Austin & North Austin!

Lazarus Brewing Co

Vibe: Retro meets modern with a nod to the man who was raised from the dead

Good for: After work tacos, or anytime tacos

Technically a brewery, but Lazarus serves some solid tacos. Yes, I eat a lot of tacos (I suppose I’ll have to do a taco guide to Austin some time… in like a year and a half). These are no-nonsense, just really good meat in a tortilla kind of tacos, and recently I’ve been on a kick where I want them every day. Nothing wrong with that right?

Plus it’s worth mentioning that this building is teal which automatically makes me love it. (I mean obviously, this picture matches the blog perfectly 😂)

My standard order: One pollo verde, one carnitas (sometimes carne asada), corn tortillas, no onion. They also serve 5-oz pours of beer! The Amandus is my favorite.

Yellow Jacket Social Club

Vibe: Tucked-away dive bar

Good for: Dinner, late night snack

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You’ve heard about Yellow Jacket’s sweet potatoes before, and you’re going to hear about them again. The first time I had these, it was Halloween and neither Marc nor I dressed up, but we went out anyway? Anyway, it was us, a bunch of witches and vampires, and I was hungry. So I got the sweet potatoes, and never looked back.

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My standard order: Sweet potatoes (with curry sauce) always! If we’re there for dinner I’ll also get the ham & gruyère sandwich.

Salt & Time

Vibe: Rustic butcher shop plus restaurant

Good for: When you want a nice dinner but don’t feel like being too fancy

For awhile Salt & Time scared me because the menu changes daily, but it’s a butcher shop and very meat-centric (thus: generally low FODMAP), and I’m glad I faced my fears and tried it! Obviously Lamberts has my heart when it comes to barbecue, but Salt & Time has some of the best meat in town.

My standard order: The menu changes daily, but generally I order from whatever sounds good off the butcher’s daily cuts. I also one time had some sort of shrimp gumbo thing that was awesome. Basically everything is good! They also have a great selection of non-standard wine & beer if you’re feeling adventurous.

Blue Dahlia Bistro

Vibe: Quaint European bistro

Good for: Lunch with friends, or if you’re feeling a glass of wine at lunch

Blue Dahlia is a cute little spot with a nice outdoor patio. My favorite is that the gluten free bread here is from a local bakery and is delicious and buttery!

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My standard order: Turkey tartine on gluten free bread

Salty Sow

Vibe: Sophisticated farmhouse

Good for: Happy hour, date night or nice dinner

Three words: duck fat fries. Maybe you don’t know what that means, but you need them in your life. That’s it. Oh also Salty Sow has a great happy hour (tacos!) and cocktails.

My standard order: Duck fat fries, always. The happy hour size is smaller than the dinner size, but it’s perfect for two people. And otherwise… everything is good. On happy hour I’ll get the milk-braised carnitas or the pork belly. For dinner, the beef shoulder is amazing, and the chicken thighs are delicious and surprisingly not-lame. I’ve also been attempting to like beets by getting the roasted beets, as they’re some of the best I’ve had yet.

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Unit-D Pizzeria

Vibe: Cozy pizzeria

Good for: all your authentic Italian pizza cravings (Dinner)

PIZZAAAAAAAA!! It’s no secret I believe classic Italian pizza is the best pizza. So when I realized Unit-D made their pizza from a sourdough starter (see this post for why I can eat sourdough), I was ecstatic. I’ve had this pizza countless times and never had any digestive issues. PLUS, it’s some of the best pizza crust I’ve had outside Italy (and we just went there so it’s fresh in my mind) — chewy and pliable, with lots of char. Need I say more?

My standard order: The pepperoni primo pizza is our go-to, but we’ve also gotten the cheese and added prosciutto or pepperoni and greens. Their arugula salad is also bomb (but go easy on the pistachios as they’re high in FODMAPs.) 

Looking for more? Read my tips for traveling and my tips for eating out on the low FODMAP diet!

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2 Comments

  1. Hi! Are you also Gluten Free? I see you mention eating Gluten Free often in the blog so I was wondering if you also found the sourdough to be harmless if you are celiac or gluten intolerant. I was super excited seeing the pizza but wondering if it will still make my father’s stomach get angry because he does FODMAP and GF.

    Reply
    • Hey Chelsea, great question! So gluten itself is not a FODMAP (gluten is a protein whereas FODMAPs are carbs), but there are FODMAPs found in wheat. Because wheat contains both gluten and FODMAPs, “gluten free” products will also not aggravate my system. However, I can eat sourdough made with wheat flour because while it does contain gluten, the sourdough process breaks down the FODMAPs! I fortunately do not have celiac, but anyone who does will want to avoid sourdough and anything containing wheat/gluten.

      I’ve got several more posts on these topics because I know it can be confusing! Read my posts “What on Earth is Gluten, Anyway?” and “Why is sourdough low FODMAP?” for a more thorough explanation! If your father doesn’t have celiac, I’d suggest trying some sourdough and see how he feels! You can read about how I slowly introduced sourdough into my diet in this post, “The Sourdough Bread Experiment.”

      Hope this helps and I’m always happy to answer any more questions!

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